Tom Bearden

Lifetime Achievement

Tom Bearden, recipient of the Sagnac Award for Lifetime Achievement, 2012

Tom Bearden, recipient of the Sagnac Award for Lifetime Achievement, 2012

In recognition of a lifetime commitment to excellence in scientific pursuit. For foundational concepts and principles describing the energy of space, for systematic theoretical investigations of practical devices claiming over-unity performance, and for ideas connecting open systems with electromagnetic fields.

Lt. Col. Thomas Eugene Bearden (US Army, retired) personally developed and published the basis for a drastic revision of electromagnetic theory and engineering, based on the work of Whittaker and Maxwell. He authored or co-authored several books and over 70 major papers published in leading science and physics journals. He developed and owned many patents on electrical devices demonstrating over-unity, and was a pioneer investigator in healing technologies incorporating bio-electric fields. His work is primarily responsible for the widespread interest and research into scalar electromagnetic phenomena througout the world over the past two decades.

Bearden holds a BS in mathematics (Northeast Louisiana University), an MS in nuclear engineering (Georgia Tech), and the army’s rare 1181 MOS, equivalent of an MS in guided missile engineering (U.S. Army Guided Missile Staff Officer’s Course, Fort Bliss, Texas). He is a nuclear and aerospace engineer, war games and weapons analyst, and military tactician, having worked directly with Nike Ajax, Nike Hercules, Hawk, SHORADS, and Patriot guided missile systems. He has over 40 years experience in air defense systems, technical intelligence, Soviet electromagnetic weaponry, artificial intelligence, computerized war games, and antiradiation missile countermeasures.

His accolades include: President and CEO of CTEC, Inc., a private R&D corporation researching free energy devices and mechanisms for interaction of EM fields with biological systems; President of the Association of Distinguished American Scientists (ADAS); Editor and publisher of Specula, Journal of the American Association of Metascience (AAMS); Board member of the AAMS, the U.S. Psychotronics Association, and Astron, a DC aerospace R&D corporation, noted for specialized RF antennas; senior scientist with aerospace company, Colsa Corp.; member of Mensa, the Society for the Investigation of the American Physics Teachers, the Alabama Academy of Science, the Air Force Association, the Association of the US Army, The American Nuclear Society, and the American Defense Preparedness Association.

As a scientist, engineer, researcher, author, inventor, musician, and a loving husband and father, Thomas E. Bearden is a true Renaissance Man. He shares Nikola Tesla’s legacy and dream to provide mankind with free, clean, limitless energy that can propel mankind to the stars, and beyond. And he has endeavored in pursuit of a greater understanding of how the universe operates at its most fundamental levels.

Donald E. Scott

Lifetime Achievement

Donald E. Scott, recipient of the Sagnac Award for Lifetime Achievement, 2012

Donald E. Scott, recipient of the Sagnac Award for Lifetime Achievement, 2012

In recognition of a lifetime commitment to excellence in scientific pursuit. For the transistor effect in the electric star model, for alternatives to magnetic reconnection as an explanation for anomalies in astronomy, and for correlations between plasma experiments in the laboratory and observations in the cosmos.

Donald E. Scott’s book, The Electric Sky (2006), broke new ground for Electric Universe theory, explaining the flow of plasmas in the solar system without resort to magnetic field “reconnection” found in conventional literature. More recently, he proposed that the stability of the sun or any star arises from a controlled feedback in the corona similar to the operation of an electronic transistor. His ideas merit attention, because they are quantifiable, testible, consistent with known data, and have the power to explain many more features of our solar system than conventional nuclear core theories.

Scott earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Electrical Engineering at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, CT. Following graduation he worked for General Electric in Schenectady, NY, and Pittsfield, MA. He earned a Doctorate in Electrical Engineering at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Massachusetts, and was a member of the faculty of the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Massachusetts/Amherst from 1959 until his retirement in 1998. During that time he was the recipient of several good-teaching awards. He was, at various times, Assistant Department Head, Director of the undergraduate program, Graduate admissions coordinator, and Director of the College of Engineering’s Video Instructional Program.