Thomas E. Phipps

Lifetime Achievement

Thomas E. Phipps, recipient of the Sagnac Award for Lifetime Achievement, 2010

Thomas E. Phipps, recipient of the Sagnac Award for Lifetime Achievement, 2010

Thomas E. Phipps, Jr. was born January 26, 1925 in Champaign, Illinois, destined for a career in physics. His father Thomas, Sr., a pioneer in atomic structure who in 1927 first measured hydrogen’s magnetic moment, taught as an emeritus professor of physical chemistry at the University of Illinois. Earning both his AB (1944) and Ph.D. (1950) in Nuclear Physics at Harvard, Phipps Jr. worked during World War II in P. M. Morse’s Operations Research Group in the Navy, and subsequently returned to Harvard to complete an experimental thesis on Molecular Beam Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) under then-future Nobel laureate Norman F. Ramsey. His career included a total of twelve years in the Pentagon – ten in systems analysis for the Navy and two in research management for the Department of Defense – as well as similar employments at Navy laboratories in California and Maryland. In 1980 he retired to form a small private physics laboratory in collaboration with his father, in which they performed experiments in electromagnetism. This research culminated in his 1986 book, Heretical Verities: Mathematical Themes in Physical Description, a masterpiece of original theoretical concepts. After his father’s death in 1990, Phipps continued both experimental and theoretical investigations into basic physics, and became one of the most prolific contributors to several independent science journals. Written in Phipps’ unique and witty style, his 2006 book, Old Physics for New, summarizes his decades-long crusade for Hertzian Dynamics, applying the total time derivative to electrodynamics. Well understood and accepted in thermo- and fluid dynamics, total time derivatives have the potency to revolutionize electrodynamics and overthrow Einsteinian paradigms in relativity theory. Phipps rightly deserves credit as the herald of this important

Milo M. Wolff

Lifetime Achievement

Milo M. Wolff, recipient of the Sagnac Award for Lifetime Achievement, 2010

Milo M. Wolff, recipient of the Sagnac Award for Lifetime Achievement, 2010

Milo Mitchell Wolff, born August 9, 1923, is a physicist, astronomer and cosmologist, who received his doctorate in physics from the University of Pennsylvania (1958) and an honorary doctorate from the U. of Sri Lanka (1992). At home in industry or academia in any part of the world, Wolff conducted research for MIT, Aerospace Corporation, the United Nations, and also taught as a professor of physics at the University of Singapore, U. of Kentucky, U. of Indonesia, and U. of Sri Lanka. He was a member of the National Academy of Science to investigate bio-energy and of the MIT team that designed the Apollo Moon-landing system, commended by NASA (1963-9). Always seizing opportunities for travel, Wolff served as chief of Science and Technology with the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa in Addis Ababa (1975-7), as a visiting astronomer the Observatory in Paris (1979), as a visiting Professor of space navigation and computers Nanjing, China (1980), and on a National Science Foundation (NSF) advisory team in Pakistan (1984). Retired from his densely packed career, Wolff turned his attention to fundamental physics in the 1980s, and authored his first book, Exploring the Physics of the Unknown Universe: An Adventurer?s Guide, in 1989. In this and subsequent work, Wolff explored what he called the wave structure of matter, claiming that waves are responsible not only for the properties of matter, but for its very existence. He has proclaimed this message in various papers and at conferences for the past twenty years, while serving on the editorial board for Frontier Perspectives, a journal dedicated to new paradigms in science.

Evert Jan Post

Lifetime Achievement

Evert Jan Post, recipient of the Sagnac Award for Lifetime Achievement, 2010

Evert Jan Post, recipient of the Sagnac Award for Lifetime Achievement, 2010

Evert Jan Post, born October 20, 1914 in Holland and going strong at 95, lays claim to the title of senior recipient of the Sagnac Award. His early work in electromagnetic circuits and applied crystallography led to his Ph.D. from the Schouten School and Kramer’s School in Holland. There Post had numerous opportunities to chat with many of the great leaders of physics in the formative years of the quantum theory. Emigrating to the US in [], Post taught physics at the University of Houston for many years. His monograph, The Formal Structure of Electromagnetics (1962), which Robert Kiehn calls the “Tourist’s Guide to Electromagnetism”, contains a masterful treatment of the non-reciprocity of the Faraday Effect not found in other textbooks like Jackson. It is especially fitting for Post to receive the Sagnac Award since many consider his 1967 article, “Sagnac Effect”, the most important explication ever made of this major phenomenon, crucial to many alternative theories and a never-ending source of embarrassment to orthodox theoreticians. Dr. Post went on to use the deRham theory to predict in 1980 the rational fraction Hall effect, and yet his publications – two years before the experiments – are never referenced, for he was not, and never will be, a member of the “everything must be quantum mechanics according to Copenhagen” clique that so dominates much of modern physics thinking. Since his retirement and move to Los Angeles, Post has written various articles on the foundations of quantum mechanics, critical of the standard Copenhagen interpretation. Though Dr. Post still considers himself an establishment physicist, the topological approach displayed in his major work, Quantum Reprogramming (1995), reveals a mind able to think clearly beyond accepted paradigms.